Highway 6 through Middle America

I have one of those big road map books with at least one page for every state.  Some states have two, or even three pages if there are lots of big cities.  My book is starting to show some wear as I work my way East.  I pondered my options for crossing Indiana and chose Highway 6 instead of the turnpike.  I’m so glad I did!

Just past Chicago, there were traffic lights every few blocks. I wondered if this was the right choice.  But once I got beyond  Portage, the road straightened out and traffic lights all but disappeared.  Going through cornfields, forests and small towns, it was easy to catch a glimpse of life in the Hoosier state.  It was beautiful and peaceful,  very little traffic, 55 mph, just the kind of road I like.

During one of our stops, we pulled up to yard full of old machines, buggies and farm implements.  I liked this shed with an assortment of things leaning against it.  I don’t know if the shed was for sale or not.  Big enough to house a lawnmower and garden tools, it would make a nice addition to my backyard.  Not sure how I would take it home with me though.

Indiana

I’ve seen so many amazing barns all across the country.  I could be happy drawing any one of them.  Most of the time, I’ve sped on by.   This view is just off Highway 6 in Ohio – a home and barn together, shaded by trees, warmed by the sun.

Ohio farm

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One Response to Highway 6 through Middle America

  1. Suzanne says:

    I’m so enjoying following your adventures in my own oversized road atlas. You have certainly picked some interesting roads! The shed is delicious. Yards full of such treasures are a good reason for wandering the back roads with a flatbed trailer in tow. There is always something interesting, and it is often for sale (because those of us who have farm equipment tend to have rather a lot of it!). We’ve hauled home everything from tractors and a combine to a paving machine. (The latter was not the smartest purchase, but it seemed like a good idea at the time). Still haven’t found the right manure spreader, but we never stop scanning the weeds when we are out driving…just in case.
    It is somehow comforting to know that, even though small farms are quickly disappearing, there are still ‘house and barn’ scattered across every state. Your drawing captures the feel of it very nicely.

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