Tag Archives: Composition

The What and the Where

  I’ve been writing about ideas from “Powerful Watercolor Landscapes,” a terrific book for artists of all media, written by Catherine Gill.  My last post looked at the “why” of a drawing.  Now let’s consider the “what” and the “where”  together, since you … Continue reading

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Developing the Drawing

Last week I started with a  basic tone of lines over the preliminary drawing .  This design becomes the foundation to build values and depict details. While filming this week’s video I was dismayed to discover that my video camera has given up the ghost … Continue reading

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Beginning the Drawing

After the very small thumbnail sketches to plan how I will compose a scene, it’s time to begin the actual drawing.  I’m going to be working on an 8″ x 10″ piece of 140 lb hot press watercolor paper.  Arches … Continue reading

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Planning a Drawing

Over the next few weeks I’m going to work through my process for planning, drawing, watercoloring and finishing a piece.      Sometimes I see a scene that I  know will make a great drawing in its entirety.  More often than not, I … Continue reading

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Improving Composition

Last week I posted a very simple drawing with some major composition flaws.  There are any number of ways to improve problems such as these.  Here again is the “wrong” picture, and a review of what I purposely drew wrong and how I … Continue reading

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What’s Wrong With This Picture?

It’s time to have some fun with composition.  I did a very simple drawing where I tried to make mistakes based on some of the concepts I covered in the last few weeks.  In doing so, I learned that trying … Continue reading

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Upside Down and Backward

One of the best ways to assess a drawing is to step back from it for a bit and analyze it objectively.   Perhaps you’re focusing intently on getting that perspective right, or making the shadow values dark enough.  When you step back, … Continue reading

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Going off on a Tangent

I don’t know about you, but when I first started drawing, I would get so excited about a subject that I couldn’t wait to get started.  I would totally ignore composition. I figured I could fix things as I went along.   When I finally … Continue reading

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Seeing the Masses

Imagine yourself walking down a forested path, coming around a corner and thinking, “What a nice view, I’d love to draw it.”   So you sit down with paper and pen – because of course your sketchbook and folding chair are handy – and … Continue reading

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Drawing with S O U L

Most people would agree that soul is an important ingredient in art.  Art derives from passion and emotion.  I’d like to suggest a new way to draw with S-O-U-L by using these four letters to represent ways of leading the eye around the picture plane.  … Continue reading

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